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Table 6 Proportional change in indoor endotoxin exposures related to predictors (household and subject characteristics) in 12 homes of children with asthma

From: Personal endotoxin exposure in a panel study of school children with asthma

Household and subject characteristics N or Mean (min-max) Adjusted coefficient (95% CI)1,2
Dog Ownership   
   No dogs 4 1.00 (referent)
   One or more dogs 8 0.92 (0.37, 2.31)
Cat Ownership   
   No cats 9 1.00 (referent)
   One or more cats 3 0.65 (0.26, 1.60)
Number of residents 4.42 (2 - 6) 1.15 (0.74, 1.76)
Carpeting   
   < 50% 5 1.00 (referent)
   ≥ 50% 7 0.64 (0.31, 1.33)
Age of carpeting   
   < median years 6 1.00 (referent)
   ≥ median years 6 1.18 (0.55, 2.50)
Flooding damage   
   No 8 1.00 (referent)
   Yes 4 0.40 (0.24, 0.69)#
Mold/mildew on surfaces   
   No 2 1.00 (referent)
   Yes 10 0.63 (0.24, 1.66)
Gender   
   Female 5 1.00 (referent)
   Male 7 1.33 (0.62, 2.87)
Age   
   13-18 years 6 1.00 (referent)
   9-12 years 6 1.36 (0.61, 3.05)
Race   
   White non-Hispanic 3 1.00 (referent)
   Hispanic 9 2.35 (1.06, 5.22)**
Mothers education   
   More than high school 9 1.00 (referent)
   High school or less 3 0.39 (0.21, 0.71)#
Family income   
   >50,000 8 1.00 (referent)
   Up to $50,000 4 1.24 (0.50, 3.09)
Temperature (°F) 80.0 (67.6 - 92.8) 1.02 (0.98, 1.08)
RH (%) 42.6 (16.7 - 62.1) 1.00 (0.97, 1.03)
  1. * p < 0.10, ** p < 0.05, # p < 0.01
  2. 1Because the dependent variable (indoor endotoxin) was log transformed, we exponentiated the regression coefficient of the predictor, thus yielding the proportional change in endotoxin exposure and 95% confidence interval (CI) and 95% confidence interval (CI).
  3. 2Adjusted for study region.