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Table 4 Numbers and percentage of adolescents and "elderly" persons with low versus high numbers of risk alleles

From: Prevalence of at-risk genotypes for genotoxic effects decreases with age in a randomly selected population in Flanders: a cross sectional study

   Low sum of risk alleles1 High sum of risk alleles1 Chi-Square
Total Adolescents 203 (48.6%) 215 (51.4%) p = 0.002
  Elderly 215 (59.4%) 147 (40.6%)  
Biotransformation Adolescents 196 (45.7%) 233 (54.3%) p = 0.005
  Elderly 204 (55.6%) 163 (44.4%)  
Phase I Adolescents 321 (73.8%) 114 (26.2%) p = 0.223
  Elderly 258 (69.9%) 111 (30.1%)  
Phase II Adolescents 190 (43.7%) 245 (56.3%) p < 0.001
  Elderly 233 (58.7%) 164 (41.3%)  
Oxidative Stress Adolescents 256 (59.5%) 174 (40.5%) p = 0.348
  Elderly 249 (62.7%) 148 (37.3%)  
DNA Repair Adolescents 233 (54.4%) 195 (45.6%) p = 0.017
  Elderly 247 (62.7%) 147 (37.3%)  
  1. 1The cut-off point between low and high sum of risk alleles was based on the median number of risk alleles for each specific pathway. A high number of risk alleles was defined as: Total: > 17 risk alleles; Biotransformation:> 5 risk alleles; Phase I: > 1 risk allele; Phase II: > 4 risk alleles; Oxidative stress: > 4 risk alleles; DNA repair > 8 risk alleles.