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Table 1 Radiation agents reviewed in the International Agency for Research on Cancer's (IARC) monograph series

From: Radiation and cancer risk: a continuing challenge for epidemiologists

Agent Group IARC Monograph Volume No. Year
Ultraviolet radiation 1 40, 55 1986, 1992
Radon-222 and its decay products 1 43, 78 1988, 2001
Ultraviolet radiation A (NB: Overall evaluation upgraded from 2B to 2A with supporting evidence from other relevant data) 2A 55 1992
Ultraviolet radiation B (NB: Overall evaluation upgraded from 2B to 2A with supporting evidence from other relevant data) 2A 55 1992
Ultraviolet radiation C (NB: Overall evaluation upgraded from 2B to 2A with supporting evidence from other relevant data) 2A 55 1992
Solar radiation 1 55 1992
X- and Gamma (γ)-Radiation 1 75 2000
Radium-224 and its decay products 1 78 2001
Radium-226 and its decay products 1 78 2001
Radium-228 and its decay products 1 78 2001
Radioiodines, short-lived isotopes, including iodine-131, from atomic reactor accidents and nuclear weapons detonation (exposure during childhood) 1 78 2001
Radionuclides, α-particle-emitting, internally deposited (NB: Specific radionuclides for which there is sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity to humans are also listed individually as Group 1 agents) 1 78 2001
Radionuclides, β-particle-emitting, internally deposited (NB: Specific radionuclides for which there is sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity to humans are also listed individually as Group 1 agents) 1 78 2001
Magnetic fields (extremely low-frequency) 2B 80 2002
Magnetic fields (static) 3 80 2002
  1. Classification of carcinogenic hazards to humans:
  2. Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans
  3. Group 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans
  4. Group 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans
  5. Group 3: Not classifiable as to carcinogenicity to humans
  6. Group 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans