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Table 3 Adjusteda associations (95% CI) between every 2-fold increase in mercury concentrations and BASC-2 anxiety scores through 8-years

From: Very low-level prenatal mercury exposure and behaviors in children: the HOME Study

Child sex Time of measurement
Mean prenatalb Mean prenatal excluding cord 16 weeks 26 weeks At delivery Cord
Total 0.71 (−0.12, 1.54) 0.82 (−0.04, 1.69) 0.83 (0.05, 1.62) 0.79 (−0.08, 1.67) − 0.35* (− 1.74, 1.03) 0.49 (− 0.24, 1.23)
Boys 0.80 (−0.24, 1.85) 0.76 (− 0.32, 1.85) 1.22 (0.27, 2.16) 0.64 (− 0.49, 1.77) 0.14 (−1.05, 1.32) 0.47 (− 0.55, 1.49)
Girls 0.91 (− 0.30, 2.12) 1.08 (− 0.20, 2.35) 0.70 (− 0.48, 1.87) 0.99 (− 0.28, 2.26) 2.13 (0.85, 3.41) 0.91 (− 0.14, 1.97)
  1. The bold numbers [cells] indicate statistical significance at p < 0.05
  2. *P value is 0.07 for the interaction term between mercury concentration at delivery and child sex
  3. aAdjusted for fish intake, maternal age at delivery (≤ 30 years and > 30 years), maternal ethnicity (white and others), annual household income (> $40,000 and ≤ $40,000), maternal education (Completed bachelor’s degree and not completed bachelor’s degree), marital status at baseline (Married/living with partner vs. unmarried/living alone), HOME score (≥ 40 or < 40), maternal depression during pregnancy (≤ 13 and > 13), child sex, child blood lead concentrations (mean of child blood lead concentrations at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months), pre-natal serum cotinine concentrations (mean of 16 weeks, 26 weeks, birth and cord concentrations) and post-natal child blood mercury concentrations (mean of child blood mercury levels at 2, 3, 4, 5 years)
  4. bMean prenatal mercury concentrations defined as a mean of maternal mercury concentrations at 16-weeks, 26-weeks of gestation, delivery, and cord blood mercury concentrations