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Table 5 The Effect of PM2.5 on Age-Specific Mortalities

From: The impact of PM2.5 on mortality in older adults: evidence from retirement of coal-fired power plants in the United States

 Models
(1)(2)(3)
 Full Sample
Age 65–75−0.53
(−2.41–1.36)
−0.53
(− 2.34–1.27)
−0.04
(− 2.10–2.01)
Age 75+14.75***
(8.40–21.10)
14.37***
(8.08–20.67)
15.40***
(9.00–21.79)
 Male
Age 65–751.18
(− 4.61–6.97)
1.24
(−4.50–6.97)
1.80
(−4.31–7.92)
Age 75+20.22***
(12.68–27.75)
19.78***
(12.34–27.23)
20.75***
(13.46–28.03)
 Female
Age 65–75−1.55
(− 4.36–1.27)
−1.62
(− 4.48–1.24)
−1.23
(− 3.86–1.40)
Age 75+11.61**
(2.57–20.66)
11.27**
(2.29–20.25)
12.32***
(3.20–21.44)
Weather ControlsNYY
Socioeconomic ControlsNNY
County Fixed EffectsYYY
Month Fixed EffectsYYY
  1. Notes: This table reports the instrumental variable regression coefficients and standard errors. Each cell represents a separate regression of monthly age-specific mortality rates (deaths per 100,000 people) on PM2.5 concentrations (μg/m3). Retirement of coal-fired power plants is used as the instrumental variables for monthly PM2.5 concentrations. The dependent variable is the monthly standardized mortality rate per 100, 000 people. The specification corresponds to the column 6 specification in Table 2. Weather controls include temperature, dew point, and barometric pressure. Socioeconomic controls include median household income and poverty rate. Standard errors are clustered at the state level. * p < 0.10, ** p < 0.05, *** p < 0.01