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Table 5 Change in the number of inhaler prescriptions (% and 95 Confidence Interval (CI)) associated with an interquartile increase in short- (daily) and long- (2009–2013) term NO2, PM10, PM2.5 and O3 concentrations. Results from mixed effects zero-inflated negative binomial model adjusting for day of the week, temperature, relative humidity, time trend, proportion of elderly residents and index of multiple deprivation

From: Spatio-temporal associations of air pollutant concentrations, GP respiratory consultations and respiratory inhaler prescriptions: a 5-year study of primary care in the borough of Lambeth, South London

  % change (95% CI)
NO2: Short-term NO2: Long-term PM10: Short-term PM10: Long-term PM2.5: Short-term PM2.5: Long-term O3: Short-term O3: Long-term
Preventive inhaler 2.07 (1.31, 2.85) 8.11 (1.03, 15.69) 0.75 (0.22, 1.29) 2.12 (−1.55, 5.92) − 0.01 (− 0.51, 0.50) 3.59 (−3.03, 10.67) − 3.50 (− 4.53, −2.46) −3.52 (− 8.93, 2.21)
Reliever inhaler 2.10 (1.42, 2.78) 1.44 (−4.34, 7.57) 0.77 (0.31,1.24) − 0.55 (− 3.61, 2.61) 0.01 (− 0.44,0.46) −3.04 (− 8.36, 2.57) −3.71 (− 4.61, − 2.80) 1.53 (− 3.37, 6.68)
Any inhaler 2.14 (1.54, 2.75) 3.01 (− 2.90, 9.27) 0.84 (0.42, 1.26) 0.16 (− 2.95, 3.37) 0.07 (− 0.32, 0.47) −1.55 (− 7.00, 4.22) −3.47 (− 4.27, − 2.65) 0.84 (− 4.07, 6.00)