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Table 2 Age-at-pregnancy standardized prevalence ratios comparing miscarriage among most recent pregnancy of firefighters to US non-firefighters

From: Occupational factors and miscarriages in the US fire service: a cross-sectional analysis of women firefighters

  Observed events Expected events aSPR (95% CI)
Firefighters compared to women from a US cohort of nursesa
 All firefighters (N = 1041) 138 59.2 2.33 (1.96–2.75)
 Employment status    
 Career (n = 892) 100 51.4 1.94 (1.58–2.37)
 Volunteer (n = 149) 38 7.8 4.90 (3.47–6.72)
 Wildland firefighter status    
 Structural (n = 685) 115 41.6 2.76 (2.28–3.32)
 Wildland/WUI (n = 354) 23 17.4 1.32 (0.84–1.98)
Firefighters compared to California women belonging to a prepaid health planb
 All firefighters (N = 1041) 138 127.0 1.09 (0.91–1.28)
 Employment status    
 Career (n = 892) 100 108.8 0.92 (0.75–1.12)
 Volunteer (n = 149) 38 18.2 2.09 (1.48–2.87)
 Wildland firefighter status    
 Structural (n = 685) 115 83.6 1.38 (1.14–1.65)
 Wildland/WUI (n = 354) 23 43.2 0.53 (0.34–0.80)
  1. US United States, aSPR age-at-pregnancy-standardized prevalence ratio, CI confidence interval, WUI wildland urban interface
  2. a Lawson et al., 2014 (DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2011.12.030). Study included 7482 women from the Nurses’ Health Study II who self-reported details about their most recent pregnancy (resulting in miscarriage or livebirth) while working as a nurse between 1993 and 2000
  3. b Slama et al., 2005 (DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwi097). Study included 5121 pregnancies (resulting miscarriage, stillbirth, or livebirth) belonging to California, US members of the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, with a prenatal appointment between February 1990 and September 1991. Data were abstracted from medical records